Wednesday, 23 November 2016

Calls for papers: ESIL, University of Windsor, UCL Postgraduate Conference

ESIL Annual Conference, Naples, 7-9 September 2017: Call for Papers 

The 13th Annual Conference of the European Society of International Law will take place in Naples, Italy, on 7-9 September 2017. The conference will be hosted by the University of Naples Federico II, the oldest public university in the world.
The theme of the conference is ''Global Public Goods, Global Commons and Fundamental Values: The Responses of International Law''.
The Call for Papers is now open. Deadline for submission of abstracts: 31 January 2017.
Further information is available on ESIL website.

TLJN Conference 2017 - Transnational Criminal Law in the Americas, 4-5 May 2017: Call for Papers

On May 4-5, 2017, the Transnational Law and Justice Network at the University of Windsor, Faculty of Law, invites academics, policy makers, NGOs, and individuals working on the ground to participate in a multidisciplinary regional dialogue about the most pressing transnational criminal law issues facing the Americas today.

Topics may include: the suppression treaty regime generally; legal responses to specific transnational crimes such as drug trafficking, human trafficking, migrant smuggling, money laundering, corruption, firearms trafficking, environmental crimes, and other transnational organized crime; institutions and accountability for transnational crime; and mutual legal assistance, cooperation and capacity building. 

Questions to be addressed may include:

•    What are the most pressing transnational criminal law issues facing the Americas today and how are these issues evolving and shifting? 

•    Should greater emphasis be placed on regional responses to transnational criminal law and how should such regional responses be structured?

•    What assumptions underlie the current legal regimes addressing transnational crime and do they adequately reflect the reality of transnational criminality today?

•    How have globalization and technological advancements shifted the nature of transnational criminality and how should this inform the legal response?

•    How do critical approaches to law inform questions of transnational criminal law?

Those interested in presenting at the conference are invited to apply by email to no later than January 20, 2017. Further information can be found on the conference website.

The Art of Balancing: The Role of Law in Reconciling Competing Interests
University College London Faculty of Laws is pleased to invite submissions for its 2017 Postgraduate and Early Careers Conference to be held on 30-31 March 2017, at University College London, London, UK.The conference is designed to provide current doctoral students and recent PhD graduates with a forum to present and discuss their work among academic peers from different backgrounds and legal disciplines. The conference aims to promote fruitful research collaboration between its participants, and to encourage their integration in a community of legal scholars.

The Conference theme is “The Role of Law in Reconciling Competing Interests”. Contemporary legal problems create the need to balance competing interests, values, rights, obligations, and freedoms. This Conference will explore the response of the law and legal actors to modern challenges, be it in the context of domestic law and national jurisdictions or in the framework of international law.
The increasing criticism against the fragmentation of legal fields have brought about the need to reconcile public, individual, and international interests. Additionally, the growing focus on States’ obligations to respect and protect human rights and freedoms has too led to a shift in the manner States conduct themselves both in the domestic and international arenas. Yet, given the ever increasing extent of international regulation and concomitant demands on limited financial, technical and human resources, it is not at all clear how these competing rights and obligations ought to be balanced. Furthermore, the mounting pressure on the States to ensure the security of their population brings about the debate over States’ ability to limit other rights and freedoms on behalf of security interests, legitimate as may be.

We welcome applications from current doctoral students, both in law and law-related disciplines, and from recent graduates of doctoral programs up to five years since the completion of their PhD. We encourage submissions engaging all disciplines of law. Selection will be based on the quality of the proposal, as well as its capacity to engage with other proposals in a collaborative dialogue.

Interested scholars should email an abstract of up to 750 words along with a short bio in no more than two paragraphs by25 December 2016 to the following address: Abstracts should reflect papers that have not been published nor submitted elsewhere for consideration for publication. Successful applicants will be selected by an Organizing Committee and notified no later than 15 January 2017.

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